California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI)

The CCTDI (P. A. Facione & N. C. Facione, 1992) was developed, validated, and used to assess students’ disposition toward critical thinking (CT). It consisted of 75 statements, divided into seven subscales: Truth-seeking, Open-mindedness, Analyticity, Systematicity, Self-confidence, Inquisitiveness, and Maturity. Responses were made on a 6-point Likert-type scale. The CCTDI reports a total score, which is the sum of its seven subscales, ranging from 70 to 420. A total score more than 280 indicates a positive overall disposition toward CT. The development and validation process is described in P. A. Facione and N. C. Facione (1992).

Content

Domains
Responsible Decision Making,
Self Awareness
Subdomain

Curiosity, Systemicity, Analyticity, Integrity, Confidence, Critical Thinking

Grades
10th Grade,
11th Grade,
12th Grade,
Post secondary
Languages
English,
Spanish,
Chinese,
Other
Other Language/s
Arabic, Dutch, Farsi, Finnish, French Canadian, German, Hebrew, Icelandic, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Portuguese, Thai, Turkish
Respondent
Student

Administration Information

Length
30 minutes
Qualifications

For reasons of test security and to protect the testing programs of our institutional and industry clients, we restrict purchase of certain of our testing products to qualified professionals and researchers as indicated on our website.

Administration
Computer,
Paper

Access and Use

Price

Price quotes available (*can be purchased with CCTST)

Contact

California Academic Press
Insight Assessment
650-697-5628
1735 N 1st Street, Suite 306
San Jose, CA 95112-4511 USA

Open Access
No
Use in Research

Facione, P. A., Sanchez, C. A., Facione, N. C., & Gainen, J. (1995). The disposition toward critical thinking. The Journal of General Education44(1), 1-25. https://www.jstor.org/stable/27797240

Laird, T. F. N. (2005). College students’ experiences with diversity and their effects on academic self-confidence, social agency, and disposition toward critical thinking. Research in Higher Education46(4), 365-387. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11162-005-2966-1

Ordem, E. (2017). Developing critical-thinking dispositions in a listening/speaking class. English Language Teaching10(1), 50-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/elt.v10n1p50

Unlu, Z. K., & Dokme, I. (2017). Science teacher candidates' epistemological beliefs and critical thinking disposition. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research72, 203-220. https://doi.org/10.14689/ejer.2017.72.11

Psychometrics

Scoring
Computer scoring,
Manual scoring
Referencing
Criterion-referenced
Psychometric References

Bondy, K. N., Koenigseder, L. A., Ishee, J. H., & Williams, B. G. (2001). Psychometric properties of the California critical thinking tests. Journal of Nursing Measurement9(3), 309-328. https://doi.org/10.1891/1061-3749.9.3.309

Facione, N. C., Facione, P. A., & Sanchez, C. A. (1994). Critical thinking disposition as a measure of competent clinical judgment: The development of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory. Journal of Nursing Education33(8), 345-350. https://doi.org/10.3928/0148-4834-19941001-05

Kakai, H. (2003). Re-examining the factor structure of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory. Perceptual and motor skills96(2), 435-438. https://doi.org/10.2466/pms.2003.96.2.435

Walsh, C. M. & Hardy, R. C. (1997). Factor structure stability of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory across sex and various students’ majors. Perceptual & Motor Skills85(3), 1211–1228. https://doi.org/10.2466/pms.1997.85.3f.1211

Yeh, M. L. (2002). Assessing the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory. International Journal of Nursing Studies39(2), 123-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0020-7489(01)00019-0 

 

Item Type
Likert