Instruments

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

The Efficacious Self-Presentation Scale (ESS) is a 36 item questionnaire that measures 6 different dimensions. All responses are expressed on a 5-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree).

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

Grades: 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

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The HEIghten® Written Communication assessment addresses four dimensions: Knowledge of social and rhetorical situations, knowledge of conceptual strategies, knowledge of language use and conventions, knowledge of the writing process. The HEIghten Written Communication assessment is administered in a single 45-minute testing session. The first section consists of an essay task that requires the test taker to compose an original response which adopts or defends a position on a claim. In the second section, the test taker is presented with two passage-based sets, each of which includes 12 selected-response questions.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

Grades: Post secondary

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The Self-Construal scale is a 30 items scale used to measure how people view themselves in relation to others. 2 subscales; interdependent self-construal and independent self-construal, comprise this scale. Each item is answered using a 7-point rating scale (1=strongly disagree, 4=neither agree or disagree, and 7=strongly agree). 15 items measure how much the repondent sees their self as separate, unique, and indepedentfrom others, while 15 items measure ho wmuch the respondent sees their self as connected, similar, and interdependent with others. Researchers have used the Self-Construal Scale with teens and adults from a wide range of socioeconomic, ethnic, and national backgrounds, including Americans of African, Asian, European, Latinx, Native, and Pacific Islander heritages who live on a low income or are working-class.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

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TeamUP is a package of teaching and learning activities based on a theoretically grounded assessment rubric (Hastie et al., 2014). This rubric was designed to guide student learning and to assess the teamwork skills that they practice while undertaking team-based academic assignments in higher education. The focus of the TeamUP Rubric is on the fundamental teamwork behaviours that can be taught, practised and assessed so that individual students are enabled to develop their skills over time. Students use the rubric to provide anonymous peer feedback to each other; the subject coordinator then assigns individual teamwork marks, taking into account peer feedback and other evidence such as project plans and meeting minutes. The other elements of TeamUP aresix lectures and six associated skills practice tutorials on topics directly relevant to the skill domains referred to in the rubric.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

Grades: Post secondary

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The Student Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (SSWQ) is a 16-item self-report behavior rating scale for measuring youths' school-specific wellbeing. The SSWQ is comprised of four subscales: (1) Joy of Learning, (2) School Connectedness, (3) Educational Purpose, and (4) Academic Efficacy. Subscale scores can be used as standalone wellbeing indicators or summed to create a Overall Student Wellbeing composite scale.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

Grades: 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade

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Social psychologist Arthur Aron and colleagues (1992) developed the single-item Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) scale to measure how close the respondent feels with another person or group. The IOS has been given to respondents as young as five years old (Cameron, 2006), as well as to teens and adults. It has also been used with respondents living on a low income and previously incarcerated respondents (Folk et al., 2016; Mashek, Cannaday, & Tangney, 2007). Respondents see seven pairs of circles that range from just touching to almost completely overlapping. One circle in each pair is labeled “self,” and the second circle is labeled “other.” Respondents choose one of the seven pairs to answer the question, “Which picture best describes your relationship with [this person/group]?” Researchers indicate what person or group the “other” circle stands for (e.g., “your romantic partner,” “your parents,” “your community,” etc.). 1 = no overlap; 2 = little overlap; 3 = some overlap; 4 = equal overlap; 5 = strong overlap; 6 = very strong overlap; 7 = most overlap.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Relational Capabilities

Grades: 1st Grade, 2nd Grade, 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, Post secondary

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