Instruments

Displaying 1 - 13 of 13

The Echelle de Motivation en Education (EME) is based on the tenets of self-determination theory and is composed of 28 items subdivided into 7 subscales assessing three types of intrinsic motivation (intrinsic motivation to know, to accomplish things, and to experience stimulation), three types of extrinsic motivation (external, introjected, and identified regulation), and amotivation. The EME was translated into English and named the Academic Motivation Scale. The English version, the AMS, showed satisfactory levels of internal consistency temporal stability over a one-month period. A confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the 7-factor structure of the AMS.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, Post secondary

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The CM3 is designed to measure the degree to which an individual is cognitively engaged and mentally motivated toward intellectual activities that involve reasoning.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

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The MTQ-48 assesses total MT and comprises four dimensions: challenge, commitment, confidence (subdivided into two components; interpersonal and own ability) and control (partitioned into two components; emotional and life). The MTQ-18 and MTQ-10 use items drawn directly from the MTQ-48.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

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This group-administered 18-item scale was developed to measure the attributes of commitment, challenge, control (life), control (emotions), confidence (abilities), and confidence (interpersonal), with three items tapping into each construct. The questionnaire was developed to be relatively short (18 items), and only include items that were developmentally appropriate for adolescents, and relevant both within and out with an education context.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: 7th Grade, 8th Grade, 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, Post secondary

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Created along the Motivation and Engagement Wheel, the Motivation and Engagement Scale consists of eleven motivation and engagement subscales congruent with the eleven first-order factors in the Wheel (i.e., self-efficacy, valuing, mastery orientation, planning, task management, persistence, anxiety, failure avoidance, uncertain control, self-handicapping, and disengagement). The eleven subscales can be separated into four major groups representing the four higher-order motivation and engagement factors (i.e., adaptive cognition, adaptive behaviour, impeding cognition, and maladaptive behaviour). Each of the eleven MES subscales comprises four items—hence, the MES is a 44-item instrument. To respond to the MES, a 7-point Likert-type scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree), is provided—with a 1(strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) scale for use with elementary/primary school students. MES has been adapted for use in 3 different educational stages (primary/elementary school MES-Junior School, high school (MES), university/college MES-University/College) and 3 additional performance domains (Music MES-Music, Work MES-Work, Sport MES-Sport)

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions, Individual Capabilities

Grades: 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, 9th Grade, 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade, Post secondary

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Created along the Motivation and Engagement Wheel, the Motivation and Engagement Scale consists of eleven motivation and engagement subscales congruent with the eleven first-order factors in the Wheel (i.e., self-efficacy, valuing, mastery orientation, planning, task management, persistence, anxiety, failure avoidance, uncertain control, self-handicapping, and disengagement). The eleven subscales can be separated into four major groups representing the four higher-order motivation and engagement factors (i.e., adaptive cognition, adaptive behaviour, impeding cognition, and maladaptive behaviour). Each of the eleven MES subscales comprises four items—hence, the MES is a 44-item instrument. To respond to the MES, a 5-point Likert-type scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree), is provided.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions, Individual Capabilities

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Created along the Motivation and Engagement Wheel, the Motivation and Engagement Scale consists of eleven motivation and engagement subscales congruent with the eleven first-order factors in the Wheel (i.e., self-efficacy, valuing, mastery orientation, planning, task management, persistence, anxiety, failure avoidance, uncertain control, self-handicapping, and disengagement). The eleven subscales can be separated into four major groups representing the four higher-order motivation and engagement factors (i.e., adaptive cognition, adaptive behaviour, impeding cognition, and maladaptive behaviour). Each of the eleven MES subscales comprises four items—hence, the MES is a 44-item instrument. To respond to the MES, a 7-point Likert-type scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree), is provided—with a 1(strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) scale for use with elementary/primary school students. MES has been adapted for use in 3 different educational stages (primary/elementary school MES-Junior School, high school (MES), university/college MES-University/College) and 3 additional performance domains (Music MES-Music, Work MES-Work, Sport MES-Sport)

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions, Individual Capabilities

Grades: Post secondary

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Scale Development:We retained the seven NGSE items Chen and Gully (1997) had found to be distinct from the SGSE scale and self-esteem. Because we wanted to ensure that the content domain of GSE would be well captured by the NGSE scale, we created seven additional NGSE items, intending to eliminate redundancies later. Consistent with procedures employed by Chen and Gully, when wording the new items we carefully referred to Eden’s GSE conceptualization, which is consistent with definitions provided by other researchers (Gardner & Pierce, 1998; Judge et al., 1997; Judge, Erez, et al.,1998). Each of the first two authors independently generated between three and five new items. We combined the items and rewrote or eliminated any that were poorly worded, were clear duplicates, or seemed inconsistent with our GSE definition. The third author then reviewed the items for clarity, consistency with theory, and redundancy. This effort yielded a total of 14 NGSE items, 7 of which were new and 7 carried over from Chen and Gully’s study. The NGSE scale was scored on a 5-point Likert-type scale from strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (5).

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: Post secondary

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The Revised Life Orientation Test is a revised version of Scheier, Carver, and Bridges', Life Orientation Test (1984). The revised version contains 10 items. Only 6 of the items are used to derive an optimism score. Four of the items are filler items and not used in the scoring. Of the 6 optimism-scored items 3 are keyed in a positive direction and 3 are keyed in a negative direction. Items are answered using a 5-point scale, 0 being strongly disagree, and 4 being strongly agree. Researchers have used the LOT-R with many kinds of people, including adults in poverty (Lynch, Kaplan, & Shema, 1997; Heinonen et al., 2006).

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

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The Educational Psychology Service, with agreement from Stirling Council and partly supported by a grant from the Scottish Government, has developed and standardized a new scale measuring both subjective and psychological aspects of wellbeing. The 12-items in this scale are rated on a Likert scale containing 5 levels with 12 being the minimum score and 60 being the maximum score. The scale covered areas of wellbeing including: optimism, cheerfulness and relaxation; satisfying Interpersonal relationships; clear thinking and competence. Overall this formed a single dimensioned scale with two sub-components described as Positive Outlook and Positive Emotional State.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions, Individual Capabilities

Grades: 3rd Grade, 4th Grade, 5th Grade, 6th Grade, 7th Grade, 8th Grade, 9th Grade, 10th Grade

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The Regulatory Focus Questionnaire (RFQ) differentiates between: A prevention focus that emphasizes safety and responsibility, views goals as oughts, and is concerned with non-losses and losses. The RFQ was derived from a factor analysis of items assessing the history of individuals’ success at promotion and prevention tasks over the course of their lives. This questionnaire consists of 11 items that are answered on a scale of 1-5.

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: Post secondary

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The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) is a 10-item scale measuring self-esteem within respondents. Half of the scale items are worded positively, while the other half are worded negatively. Each scale item is reponded to using a 4-point Likert scale, 1 being totally disagree and 4 being totally agree

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: 8th Grade, 9th Grade, 10th Grade

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Dispositional Hope Scale [22] assesses a global trait based hope score for individuals above 15 years old. The scale is in 4-point Likert-type scale ranging from Definitely False to Definitely True. There are twelve items in the scale distributed as follows: pathways subscale (4 items), agentic thinking subscale (4 items) and four negative statements called fillers that aren’t related to hope.

According to Snyder’s (1995, 2002) point of view, hope includes three components: (a) goals that have sufficient value to an individual and require a certain amount of effort to achieve, and (b) Pathways thinking, which refers to the reasonable Pathways that are designed by the individual to reach his or her goals. In addition, when there are obstacles blocking one of the Pathways the individual is able to create alternative Pathways to achieve the goals: (c) Agency thinking, a motivational factor related to hope, which refers to the individual’s perception of his or her own ability to utilise Pathways and strategies to achieve goals

Domain: Beyond Academic Capabilities

Subdomain: Attitudes & Dispositions

Grades: 10th Grade, 11th Grade, 12th Grade

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